Review of Communication Research

COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY                                                                                                 

Title & Authors

Mobile Communication and Network Privatism: A Literature Review of the Implications for Diverse, Weak, and New Ties

Scott W. Campbell (University of Michigan, USA)

Highlights

• Research on the implications of mobile communication for social network connectivity has emphasized its role in strengthening core ties by tightening the flows of network connectivity.

• Some theorists argue that mobile communication may constrain contact with diverse, weak, and new ties when time and attention is drawn (socially) inward toward close personal ties.

• Synthesizing the literature, this article offers the concept of “Network Privatism” to characterize theoretical propositions that mobile communication constrains contact with diverse, weak, and new ties.

• Review and analysis of available empirical findings resulted in notably limited support for perspectives that mobile communication constrains diverse, weak, and new tie contact.

• Additionally, the review helps map out the conceptual and methodological terrain as this line of inquiry develops along with evolutions in technological affordances and social practices.

Abstract

Most of the research on the implications of mobile communication for social networks has focused on its uses and consequences in the intimate realm of close friends, family, and loved ones. A number of scholars have also become interested in ways that mobile communication helps and hinders the broader realm of network connectivity, including diverse, weak, and new ties. A collection of theoretical perspectives on mobile communication and diverse, weak, and new ties proposes that heightened connectivity in the intimate realm can come at the expense of being engaged more broadly – a scenario I characterize as network privatism. At the same time, the available empirical research in the literature tends to tell a different story, or rather stories. This analysis brings theory and empirical findings into closer conversation with one another by reviewing and synthesizing the literature in this area. Observed patterns in the literature offer new insight into questions of mobile communication and network privatism, while also pointing to opportunities for refinement of theory, analysis, and measurement as this line of inquiry further develops.

Content

THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ON MOBILE COMMUNICATION AND NETWORK PRIVATISM

Connected Presence through the Connected Mode of Mobile Communication

From Connected Presence to Bounded Solidarity

Telecocooning

Monadic Clusters

CONFRONTING THEORY WITH EMPIRICAL FINDINGS

Mobile Communication and Network Diversity

Constraint

Overshadowed

Support

Mobile Communication and Weak Ties

Constraint

Overshadowed

Supportive

Mobile Communication and New Ties

Constraint

Overshadowed

Supportive

DISCUSSION

Table 1. Sources of Empirical Findings by Category

Concluding Remarks

REFERENCES

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Mobile communication and network privatism: A literature review of the implications for diverse, weak, and new ties

Scott W. Campbell

 

Keywords: Mobile Communication; Mobile Phone; Cell Phone; Network Privatism; Diversity; Weak Ties; New Ties; Social Networks

  Filesize 326.38 KB Download 3066

 

How to cite

Campbell, S. W. (2015). Mobile communication and network privatism: A literature review of the implications for diverse, weak, and new ties. Review of Communication Research, 3 (1), 1-21. doi: 10.12840/issn.2255-4165.2015.03.01.006

Keywords

Mobile Communication; Mobile Phone; Cell Phone; Network Privatism; Diversity; Weak Ties; New Ties; Social Networks.

Repositories

Permanent repositories where you can find this article:

Internet Archive (Community Texts) @ https://archive.org/details/texts

Academia.edu @ http://independent.academia.edu/ReviewofCommunicationResearch

Social Science Open Access Repository @ http://www.ssoar.info/en/home.html

About the Author

Scott W. Campbell, PhD is Pohs Professor of Telecommunications and Associate Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan. His research helps explain mobile communication behaviors and consequences. Campbell’s work is published in Journal of Communication, Human Communication Research, Communication Monographs, Communication Research, New Media & Society, Mobile Media & Communication, and other venues. He has also co-edited two books (with Rich Ling) for the Mobile Communication Research Series and collaborated with the Pew Internet & American Life Project on a national study of teens and mobile communication. Campbell is an associate editor of Human Communication Research and serves on the editorial boards for Journal of Communication, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. New Media & Society, Mobile Media & Communication, Communication Reports, and Revista Chilena de Communicación. More at: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/comm/facultystaff/faculty/campbellscott_ci

COMMUNICATION THEORY                                                                                                 

Title & Authors

The Complexity Paradigm for Studying Human Communication: A Summary and Integration of Two Fields

John L. Sherry (Michigan State University, USA)

Highlights

• There is a third paradigm of science, commonly referred to as complexity science.

• It provides analytic methods that will facilitate the study dynamic and interactive communication processes.

• Though the complexity science paradigm is not well-known to communication scientists, it has facilitated important discoveries in most other branches of science.
• The complexity paradigm focuses on how simple rules (e.g., basic laws of evolution) generate highly complex-appearing systems (e.g., all life on Earth).
• The characteristics of communicative interaction processes are a strong fit with criteria for complex systems.
• Communicative interaction can be modeled and tested using a computer simulation.
• Complexity will require researchers to integrate existing knowledge into a very different paradigm, slowing broad-based adoption in the field.

 

Abstract

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
Hamlet (Act 1, Scene 5)


This popular quote from Hamlet might be recast for the field of communication as “There are more things in science than are dreamt of in our philosophies”. This article will review several new and strange ideas from complexity science about how the natural world is organized and how we can go about researching it. These strange ideas, (e.g., deterministic, but unpredictable systems) resonate with many communication phenomena that our field has traditionally had difficulty studying. By reviewing these areas, we hope to add a new, compelling and useful way to think about science that goes beyond the current dominant philosophy of science employed in communication. Though the concepts reviewed here are difficult and often appear at odds with the dominant paradigm; they are not. Instead, this approach will facilitate research on problems of communication process and interaction that the dominant paradigm has struggled to study. Specifically, this article explores the question of process research in communication by reviewing three major paradigms of science and then delving more deeply into the most recent: complexity science. The article provides a broad overview of many of the major ideas in complexity science and how these ideas can be used to study many of the most difficult questions in communication science. It concludes with suggestions going forward for incorporating complexity science into communication.

 

Content

THE COMPLEXITY PARADIGM FOR STUDYING HUMAN COMMUNICATION

THE DOMINANT PARADIGM IN COMMUNICATION SCIENCE

Table 1. Weaver’s historical eras of science

DIFFERENT ERAS USE DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO SCIENCE

WHAT ARE COMPLEX SYSTEMS? A BRIEF INTRODUCTION

Definitions

Collections.

Multiplicity.

Parallelism.

Iteration.

Recursion.

Feedback.

Types of Complexity

Algorithmic complexity.

Deterministic complexity.

Figure 1. The Lorenz attractor

Aggregate Complexity.

ORGANIZED COMPLEXITY AND COMMUNICATION SCIENCE

Is Communication a Complex System?

Collections.

Multiplicity.

Parallelism.

Iteration.

Table 2. Characteristics of Communication and Complex Systems

Recursion.

Feedback.

Communication Considerations of Complexity

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR COMPLEXITY RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION

A process for studying complex systems

Assess fit to paradigm.

Think about the type of complexity.

Specify the system.

Determine the rule for change over time.

Formalize and test the system.

Verify and modify the system.

Figure 2. Screen grab of Conway’s Game of Life program Golly

Use of the simulation.

THE WAY FORWARD FOR COMPLEXITY AND COMMUNICATION

Don’t forget the past

The future will be difficult

The two bottlenecks

FINAL THOUGHTS

REFERENCES

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The Complexity Paradigm for Studying Human Communication: A Summary and Integration of Two Fields

John L. Sherry

 

Keywords: Complexity, systems theory, process, simulation, dynamics, interaction, information theory, emergence

 

  Filesize 740.87 KB Download 2515

 

How to cite

 

Sherry, J. L. (2015). The complexity paradigm for studying human communication: A summary and integration of two fields. Review of Communication Research, 3(1), 22-54. doi: 10.12840/issn.2255-4165.2015.03.01.007

 

Keywords

Complexity, systems theory, process, simulation, dynamics, interaction, information theory, emergence.

Repositories

Permanent repositories where you can find this article:

Internet Archive (Community Texts) @ https://archive.org/details/texts

Academia.edu @ http://independent.academia.edu/ReviewofCommunicationResearch

Social Science Open Access Repository @ http://www.ssoar.info/en/home.html

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