Review of Communication Research

INTERPERSONAL AND INTERGROUP COMMUNICATION                                                                                                

Title & Authors

Music and Intergroup Relations: Exacerbating Conflict and Building Harmony through Music

Jake Harwood (University of Arizona, USA)

Highlights

• Examines music as a form of communication.

• Reviews current work on communication and music from various disciplines and perspectives.

• Reviews an intergroup approach to communication.

• Presents ways in which music can be considered as a form of intergroup communication.

• Examines prospects for music to exacerbate or ameliorate intergroup conflict.

• Presents a plan for future research on intergroup communication and music.

Abstract

This article describes the ways in which music is an important part of identity, and hence serves some similar functions to other forms of identity-related communication (e.g., language). It will describe how music is used to incite intergroup hatred (e.g., among soccer fans, military music) and to support valued identities (anthems, etc.). Relevant literature on stereotyping (including stereotyping of groups related to music) is included. The article also discusses how music is used to reduce intergroup hostility (e.g., via cross-cultural musical collaboration and contact). The article connects the various literatures from communication, social psychology, sociology, and ethnomusicology, providing a broad overview of the many connections between communication, music, and social identity. It closes with a research agenda for those interested in studying intergroup communication and music.

Content

 GROWTH OF ONLINE SUPPORT GROUPS/COMMUNITIES

CONNECTIONS BETWEEN MUSIC AND COMMUNICATION

Research on Music and Communication

Is it the Music, or the Lyrics, or the Multimedia Context?

SOCIAL IDENTITY APPROACHES TO INTERGROUP COMMUNICATION MUSIC AS INTERGROUP COMMUNICATION I: MUSIC AND SOCIAL CATEGORIZATION

Music Represents Social Categories

Music and Stereotyping

Music as Category

MUSIC AS INTERGROUP COMMUNICATION II: MUSIC, INGROUP FAVORITISM, OUTGROUP DEROGATION, AND INTERGROUP CONFLICT

Music for Group Mobilization

Intergroup Effects of Music and Musical Content

Music and Lyrics to Incite Intergroup Hostility

Musical Subcultures and Conflict

MUSIC AND INTERGROUP COMMUNICATION III: MUSIC AS A RESPONSE TO THREATENED GROUP IDENTITY

Social Mobility

Social Creativity

Social Competition

MUSIC AS INTERGROUP COMMUNICATION IV: MUSIC AND POSITIVE INTERGROUP RELATIONS

Music as Parasocial Contact

Music as Vicarious Contact

Direct Intergroup Musical Contact

Messages of Tolerance and Harmony in Lyrics

MUSIC AS INTERGROUP COMMUNICATION V: DIMENSIONS FOR STUDY AND A RESEARCH AGENDA

Dimensions for Studying Music and Intergroup Communication

Table 1. Musical factors increasing or decreasing intergroup tolerance Research Agenda

CONCLUSIONS

REFERENCES

COPYRIGHTS AND REPOSITORIES

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Music and intergroup relations: Exacerbating conflict and building harmony through music

Jake Harwood

Keywords: Intergroup relations, Music, Contact, Identity, Prejudice.

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How to cite

Harwood, J. (2017). Music and intergroup relations: Exacerbating conflict and building harmony through music. Review of Communication Research, 5, 1-34. doi: 10.12840/issn.2255-4165.2017.05.01.012

Keywords

Intergroup relations, Music, Contact, Identity, Prejudice.

Repositories

Permanent repositories where you can find this article:

Internet Archive (Community Texts) @ https://archive.org/details/texts

Academia.edu @ http://independent.academia.edu/ReviewofCommunicationResearch

Social Science Open Access Repository @ http://www.ssoar.info/en/home.html

About the Author

Jake Harwood is professor at the Department of Communication of University of Arizona, USA.

 

Author biographical information:

Personal website

Google scholar page

 

 

Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Communication in Health-Related Online Social Support Groups/Communities: A Review of Research on Predictors of Participation, Applications of Social Support Theory, and Health Outcomes

 

 

MASS COMMUNICATION                                                                                                

Title & Authors

Thinking about the media: A review of theory and research on media perceptions, media effects perceptions, and their consequences

Douglas M. McLeod, David Wise and Mallory Perryman

(University of Wisconsin at Madison, USA)

Highlights

• This article examines theory and research examining citizens’ perceptions of media and perceptions of media effects.

• Four research areas are highlighted: media trust/credibility perceptions, Hostile Media Perceptions, Persuasive Press Inference, and Third-person Perceptions.

• The psychological processes that contribute to media perceptions include selective perception, assimilation and contrast, and confirmation and disconfirmation biases.

• Psychological processes involved in perceptions of media effects include selectivity, ego defensiveness/enhancement, negativity bias, optimistic bias, self-categorization, and stereotyping.

• Media trust and credibility are two interrelated media perceptions of crucial importance to media practitioners and media researchers.

• The Hostile Media Perception occurs when ideological predispositions lead individuals to perceive media bias against their own interests.

• The Persuasive Press Inference involves assumptions about media effects consistent with the perceived slant of media.

• Third-person Perceptions are when individuals see others as being more affected by harmful media content than they are themselves.

• This article examines theory and research on these perceptions, their antecedents and consequences, and offers suggestions for future research.

Abstract

This review explicates the past, present and future of theory and research concerning audience perceptions of the media as well as the effects that perceptions of media have on audiences. Before the sections that examine media perceptions and media effects perceptions, we first identify various psychological concepts and processes involved in generating media-related perceptions. In the first section, we analyze two types of media perceptions: media trust/credibility perceptions and bias perceptions, focusing on research on the Hostile Media Perception. In both cases, we address the potential consequences of these perceptions. In the second section, we assess theory and research on perceptions of media effects (often referred to as Presumed Influence) and their consequences (referred to as the Influence of Presumed Influence). As examples of Presumed Influence, we evaluate the literature on the Persuasive Press Inference and the Third-Person Perception. The bodies of research on media perceptions and media effects perceptions have been featured prominently in the top journals of the field of mass communication over the past 20 years. Here we bring them together in one synthetic theoretical review.

Content

INTRODUCTION

MEDIA PERCEPTION CONCEPTS AND PROCESSES

MEDIA PERCEPTIONS AND EFFECTS OF MEDIA PERCEPTIONS

Media Trust and Credibility Perceptions and Effects

Factors shaping perceptions of media trustworthiness and credibility

Consequences of media trust and credibility perceptions

Future directions for media trust and credibility research

Hostile Media Perceptions and Effects

Perception moderators

Effects of Hostile Media Perceptions

Future directions for HMP research

MEDIA EFFECTS PERCEPTION CONCEPTS AND PROCESSES

PERCEPTIONS OF MEDIA EFFECTS AND EFFECTS OF PERCEIVED MEDIA EFFECTS

Persuasive Press Inference and Effects

History and rationale

Perceptions of public opinion

Accuracy of perceptions

Alternative links between media and public opinion

Support for the presumed influence mechanism

Future directions for PPI research

Third-person Perceptions and Effects

Explanations for 3PP

The social distance corollary

Different approaches to measuring the 3PP

Message desirability

Perception moderators

Consequences of 3PP (3PE)

Future directions for 3PP research

CONCLUSIONS

REFERENCES

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open access verde 

Thinking about the media: A review of theory and research on media perceptions, media effects perceptions, and their consequences

McLeod, D. M., Wise, D., & Perryman, M.

Keywords: Media Perceptions; Media Effects Perceptions; Media Trust; Media Credibility; Media Bias; Hostile Media Perception; Presumed Influence; Influence of Presumed Influence; Persuasive Press Inference; Third-person Perception;

  Filesize 744.42 KB Download 449

 

How to cite

McLeod, D. M., Wise, D., & Perryman, M. (2017). Thinking about the media: A review of theory and research on media perceptions, media effects perceptions, and their consequences. Review of Communication Research, 5, 35-83. doi:10.12840/issn.2255-4165.2017.05.01.013

Keywords

Media Perceptions; Media Effects Perceptions; Media Trust; Media Credibility; Media Bias; Hostile Media Perception; Presumed Influence; Influence of Presumed Influence; Persuasive Press Inference; Third-person Perception.

Repositories

Permanent repositories where you can find this article:

Internet Archive (Community Texts) @ https://archive.org/details/texts

Academia.edu @
http://independent.academia.edu/ReviewofCommunicationResearch

Social Science Open Access Repository @ http://www.ssoar.info/en/home.html

About the Author

Douglas M. McLeod is the Evjue Centennial Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication. His research develops three lines of inquiry: 1) social conflicts and the mass media; 2) media framing effects, and 3) public opinion. He focuses on the role of the media in both domestic and international conflicts, news coverage of social protest and its effects on audiences. McLeod has published more than 100 journal articles, book chapters, and law reviews. He recently published News Framing and National Security: Covering Big Brother examines how news framing of domestic surveillance influences audience assessments of issues related to national security and civil liberties.

Google scholar page

 

David Wise (University of Wisconsin at Madison, School of Journalism and Mass Communication). His research examines news media practices and content and how they interact with audience predispositions to influence attitudes about the news media and public affairs.

 

Mallory Perryman (University of Wisconsin at Madison, School of Journalism and Mass Communication). Her research explores how the news media audience imagines media messages affect others. 

 

 

 

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