REVIEW OF COMMUNICATION RESEARCH
specializes in publishing literature review articles
INTERPERSONAL AND INTERGROUP COMMUNICATION                                                                                                

Title & Authors

What the differences in conflict between online and face-to-face work groups mean for hybrid groups: A state-of-the-art review

Jessica Kahlow (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA)

Hanna Klecka (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA)

Erin Ruppel (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA)

Highlights

 

• State of the art at November 2019.

Most groups use a combination of face-to-face and online communication, making them hybrid.

Synthesizes 68 articles on conflict in face-to-face, hybrid, and online task groups and discusses what this means.

• Themes related to conflict in online groups include conflict management styles, decision-making, cultural differences, and trust.

• Group performance as an outcome variable persists across our themes, illustrating the importance of understanding conflict in hybrid groups.

• Future research should examine conflict in hybrid groups using computer-mediated communication perspectives.

 

Abstract

Conflict has been a topic widely studied in communication and management studies literature. How groups handle conflict can affect group performance, satisfaction, and commitment (Martínez-Moreno, González-Navarro, Zornoza, & Ripoll, 2009; Pazos, 2012; Staples & Webster, 2007; Workman, 2007). Much of this literature focuses on online, task-oriented work groups, and how these groups differ from face-to-face (F2F) groups. However, hybrid groups (i.e., those that work both F2F and online) are increasingly common. To better understand conflict in hybrid groups, we review 68 articles regarding online, hybrid, and F2F groups that highlight the differences between F2F and online groups and consider what these differences mean for hybrid groups. In doing so, we identify several emergent themes related to how conflict is managed in online and hybrid groups. The literature suggests that there are many benefits to online and hybrid groups, such as the ability to assemble more diverse teams and work asynchronously, but that conflict is also more common in online than F2F groups. Strong norms and leadership behaviors that encourage trust and cohesion appear to reduce conflict and its effects on group performance and decision making, especially in online groups. These findings suggest that in hybrid groups, F2F meetings might be used to quickly establish group norms, trust, and cohesion, which can then improve online group interactions. However, more research is needed to understand how conflict occurs and is managed in hybrid groups. Future communication research should focus on examining conflict management in hybrid groups using computer-mediated communication perspectives.

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What the differences in conflict between online and face-to-face work groups mean for hybrid groups: A state-of-the-art review

Jessica Kahlow (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA)

Hanna Klecka (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA)

Erin Ruppel (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA)

 

Keywords: Conflict; CMC; Online Groups; Hybrid Groups; Intergroup Communication; Organizational Communication; Review;

  Filesize 5 MB Download 113

 

 

Content

 

 

Introduction

Conceptualizing Online and Hybrid Groups

Conceptualizing Online Groups for Future Research.

Why Conflict Differs in Different Group Types

Literature Search

Synthesizing Hybrid Groups

Conflict Management Styles

Conflict management strategies.

Leadership styles.

Establish norms.

Decision Making

Conflict type.

Group formation.

Cultural Differences

Organizational culture.

Cultural diversity.

Trust

Emotion management.

Thematic Implications and Future Research

Conflict Management Implications

Leadership Implications

Decision Making Implications

Cultural Differences Implications

Trust Implications

Performance Outcomes

Disciplinary Implications and Future Directions for Communication Research

Conclusion

References

Appendix. Reviewed articles

Copyrights and Repositories

 

 

 

Keywords

Conflict, CMC, Online Groups, Hybrid Groups, Intergroup Communication, Organizational Communication, Review.

 

About the Authors

 

Jessica Kahlow is a Ph.D. fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA where her research focuses on technology in interpersonal communication and group contexts.

Hanna Klecka earned her M.A. at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA. Her research focuses on communication-related to small groups, social influence, technology, and gender roles.

Erin Ruppel is an Associate Professor of Communication at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA where she studies the intersections of communication technologies, interpersonal relationships, and health. 

 

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